kransekageringe - cornet - dekoration @ danishthings.com
kransekage rings – cornet – decoration

New Year is equal to KRANSEKAGE – marzipan wreath cake

The kransekage (literally wreath cake) The Danes prepare it for special occasions such as New Year’s Eve, weddings, graduation and birthdays.

I can not remember when I first made kransekage for New Year’s eve
– but I know that my sister and I made a Kransekage Cornucopia for New Year’s eve 1999/2000 – and that’s long time ago.

I’ve baked kransekage in many ways and used moulds or measuring.
Kransekage Moulds was NOT a hit with me.
I have gone back to the old method of measuring out pieces and shape rings.

I have also tried to use a piping bag to make kransekage.
If you want to try that use a larger amount of egg white, so the dough becomes more fluid.
It works fine for small kransekage pieces or cakes, but it is not stable enough for a tower.

For the New Year, I usually make the traditional cake tower, but I’ve also made a few cornucopia and a kransekage clock. This year I will make a traditional tower.

kransekage @ danishthings.com
There is no photo of the decorated Kransekage – marzipan wreath cake
– it gets decorated New Year’s Eve.

I still use pasteurised egg whites.
There are two reasons for that:

– I know that there is no salmonella in Danish eggs anymore.
BUT there was a biscuit cake accident 10+ years ago, where a father and son died eating a cake made with ordinary raw eggs.

I do NOT want anyone’s life on my conscience – the old scare campaign still work.

I ALWAYS use pasteurised eggs for dishes that I do not cook – it’s the first reason.

It is your choice 🙂

The second reason is that it is much easier to buy egg whites or egg yolks for cake/dessert recipes.

Weight/volume is ALWAYS the same, so the result should also be the same EVERY time.

There is something about food chemistry and baking …

I’ve tried A LOT of cake recipes with marzipan.
Some cake recipes with homemade almond, both using scalded almonds and almonds with skin.
– The last version makes more of an almond cake than marzipan since I can not get my almond meal fine enough.

The easiest to use, and the product that gives the traditional taste and consistency, is marzipan, and that is what I use in my cake recipe.

kransekage @ danishthings.com

Kransekage – marzipan wreath cake tips:

The Marzipan mass can also be used for homemade confectionery.

If you make small kransekage pieces or cakes, it can be delicious with a filling.
Fill some with nougat, other with orange or chocolate,

Kransekage confectionery tastes good if there are nut flakes on top AND if the bottom is dipped in dark chocolate.

When you bake the cake – use a GOOD marzipan with more than 60% almonds.
It is a cake that takes some time to make, use good ingredients.
You CAN taste the difference.

Hey – keep a good hand cream near, you will need the afterwards – I wash my hands ALL the time; marzipan is even stickier when it is mixed with sugar and egg white …

Print Recipe
Kransekage - marzipan wreath cake
© danishthings.com
Kransekage - marzipan wreath cake
Servings
Ingredients
Kransekage
  • 50 g pasteurised egg whites
  • 200 g cane sugar or confectioner's sugar
  • 800 g marzipan 63% almonds
Royal icing
  • 100 g confectioner's sugar
  • 20-30 g pasteurised egg white
Servings
Ingredients
Kransekage
  • 50 g pasteurised egg whites
  • 200 g cane sugar or confectioner's sugar
  • 800 g marzipan 63% almonds
Royal icing
  • 100 g confectioner's sugar
  • 20-30 g pasteurised egg white
Kransekage - marzipan wreath cake
Instructions
Kransekage
  1. Egg whites and sugar are mixed and refrigerated for at least one hour. This is done to dissolve the sugar.
  2. Use a stand mixer with a K paddle. Start with the sugar-egg white mixture and add marzipan - a little at a time. Stir until the mixture is uniform and smooth. If using powdered sugar, stir the egg whites and icing sugar together first before you add the marzipan. You can mix it by hand.
    Use a stand mixer with a K paddle. Start with the sugar-egg white mixture and add marzipan - a little at a time. Stir until the mixture is uniform and smooth. If using powdered sugar, stir the egg whites and icing sugar together first before you add the marzipan. You can mix it by hand.
  3. Put the finished kransekage mass in a plastic bag. Put it in the refrigerator at least 2 hours or save it for the next day.
  4. Roll out the kransekage mass in bars, about 2 ½ cm thick.
  5. Each bar is lightly pressed on the side facing toward you so that the bar becomes a slightly rounded triangle. Cut into neat pieces with 4 cm intervals - begin with 8 cm then 12 cm, 16 cm, 20 cm and so on. Also, remember to make a ball for the top of the cake.
  6. Loosen the bars with a palette knife or kitchen knife and lay them on a baking sheet lined with baking paper. Form each measured piece to a ring, remember to make the point of the triangle upwards. Smooth the cake rings, use a very tiny bit of water on your fingers. Be careful not to get the marzipan too wet.
    Loosen the bars with a palette knife or kitchen knife and lay them on a baking sheet lined with baking paper. Form each measured piece to a ring, remember to make the point of the triangle upwards. Smooth the cake rings, use a very tiny bit of water on your fingers. Be careful not to get the marzipan too wet.
  7. You have to make the top of the rings level to make a nice tower. Use a baking sheet with a piece of baking paper on the rings - press lightly to level and remove the baking sheet and paper again.
  8. Bake the wreaths at 200 ° C until golden approx 14-20 min.
Royal icing
  1. Beat together confectioners sugar and some of the pasteurised egg whites, you can always add more, on high-speed for at least 5 minutes. The icing should be pretty thick and no longer flow together when beaters are stopped, add more egg whites or sugar if needed.
  2. Put the royal icing in a small cornet, (a triangular piece of wax paper/baking paper, folded into a cone). Alternatively, you can use a freezer bag, cut a micro hole in one corner and hold the bag tightly.
  3. Select the serving dish the kransekage is served on, and place the largest ring.
    Select the serving dish the kransekage is served on, and place the largest ring.
  4. Begin decorating, move the tip of your cornet back and forth across the rings. Make sure to extend the tip out over the edge to allow the icing to drop down the outside in a loop style zig zag stripe. Start on the largest baked, cooled ring. Put the second largest baked ring on top - repeat on all the rings until the smallest ring and finish with the ball as the top.
  5. Let the finished cake dry for a few hours at room temperature.
  6. To keep the kransekage for one of the following days, cover the cake with plastic and place it in a cool room.
  7. Decorate the cake festive use flags, new year's crackers, serpentines or similar.
Recipe Notes

TIP
Decorate the cake. with chocolate doodles or flowers made of modelling chocolate.

If you decorate your cake rings while they are slightly warm the royal icing dries faster.

The rings can be decorated individually and assembled with melted chocolate.

You can bake the kransekage as smaller cakes. Form bars approx 5 cm long or round little cakes, bake them at 200 ° C until golden about 8-10 min. The bottom of the cakes can be dipped in dark chocolate.

For the chocolate: Chop dark chocolate into small pieces and melt over a water-bath of gently simmering water or in the microwave oven. Dip each kransekage into melted chocolate and place it on a baking sheet. Allow the chocolate to set - to speed up this process place the kransekage in refrigerator for 10 minutes, take out and bring back to room temperature.
Store kransekager in an airtight container.

Double up two large baking sheets for extra insulation to avoid burning the bottom of the cakes.

Kransekage - marzipan wreath cake © danishthings.com